Behavior & Development

Tips for Raising Honest Children

We are living in an era of “fake news.” Our leaders persist in getting their facts wrong and various online “news” sources continue to peddle harmful nonsense. While there should always be room for making an innocent mistake and correcting it, lying is another situation entirely. Honesty matters. It’s a key component to healthy relationships. As parents, we want our children to be honest, but how do we encourage truth-telling?

Creating A Better World Through Emotional Intelligence

It’s January 2020, and there are a lot of heavy things happening in the world. Meanwhile, at home, the transition back to “regular life” after the holidays may be proving to be messy. You might be at the point of telling yourself or your partner to “push through!” while telling your kids to stop arguing and put their socks on already. Why would anyone choose this month to focus on emotional intelligence while so many issues—global crises, daily demands, and the challenge of establishing new habits—are smacking us in the face?

How Dr. Getzelman Uses Genetic Assessments to Treat ADHD and Anxiety

Behavior and anxiety disorders among children are at an all-time high. A recent study revealed that attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in kids has become more common over the past twenty years, with an increase from 6.1 percent in 1997 to 10.2 percent in 2016 – that’s over 6 million kids between 2-17 years! This is the “new normal,” but this is NOT normal.

Knowing What to Expect Helps You Successfully Manage Your Toddler’s Behavior

It’s completely natural for parents to lose patience with emotionally erratic toddlers. However, according to this ZERO TO THREE National Parent Survey, parental frustration during this phase can stem from significantly overestimating the age at which children master skills of self-control, creating what is called an “expectation gap.”

Featured guest post by Kelly White: “Astonishingly Good”

Today is my 101st consecutive day of meditation, and I feel astonishingly good. I feel calm, alert, and super smart. Amazing, right? Most importantly, I don’t feel anxious.

The constantly looping, stomping, and crashing parade of worries and what-ifs disbanded and left my mind about a week ago. Only a few of the more reasonable concerns remain, and they’re cool. They’re sitting down and hanging out quietly until I choose to deal with them.

Natural Alternatives to Treating ADD/ADHD & Anxiety – With The Help of 23andMe

In our last case study, Could Gluten be to Blame for Your Child’s Behavioral Issues?, we shared Kasey’s story – she is a patient from our San Francisco practice who came to us for help with an ADHD and anxiety disorder diagnosis. As the title suggests, we were able to link Kasey’s behavioral issues to a gluten sensitivity. But it turns out that gluten was only partially to blame.

Dr. Getzelman Gets to the Heart of Your Child’s Health with Genetic Analysis

The current generation is the first whose lifespans will be shorter than their parents’, and the incidence of chronic illness is to blame. Some statistics claim that 1 in 3 children have a chronic illness diagnosis with obesity, Type 2 diabetes, asthma, life-threatening allergies, Celiac disease, autism and ADHD leading the charge. These conditions have skyrocketed in just 30 years – and will only continue to climb.

Magnesium Part 2: A Mother’s Success Story

In our previous post, “Magnesium: The Wonder Mineral,” we praised magnesium as a key ingredient for keeping us physically and emotionally balanced. To recap, magnesium is a “co-enzyme” for over 300 fundamental biochemical reactions in our bodies ­– meaning these critical biological processes could not occur without the help of magnesium.

Could Gluten be to Blame for Your Child’s Behavioral Issues?

Some kids simply can’t tolerate gluten and that can manifest in different ways. The array of complaints can include, but aren’t limited to, stomach aches and other digestive issues, nasal congestion, headaches, itchy/watery eyes, skin rashes, and mood complaints such as anxiety or depression. It’s also becoming more and more apparent, especially among functional medicine pediatricians, that a gluten sensitivity can negatively impact a child’s behavior.